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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion across the board has suffered in recent decades. but i think what's amazing and inspiring about this new pope is, you know, he's really breathing new life into the catholic conversation in a way we haven't seen in quite some time. i think his emphasis on personal humility, is connecting with people in their hearts in a way we haven't seen in quite some time. >> father john what is this pope francis effect? how would you explain it? >> i think at the time he was elected and announced at the loggia at st. peter's he seemed very shy and he is truly a charismatic figure. somebody in francis he doesn't just talk about the faith, he truly lives it. you see the things that have gone viral, when he goes and he embraces a man who is disfigured from an illness that causes boils, when he stands with a young boy, it's almost like jesus would let the children come to me. those things go viral and i think it sends a message that this pope is really someone who talks about jesus christ and acts like jesus christ. and there's an attraction and power to that. and i think people are very hungry f
walks of life, all religion i don't knows, all colors and ages gather here. this is the south africa that nelson mandela dreamed of. >> talk a little bit about -- south afterdan people were so protective of nelson mandela, especially in his final days and now that his death is finally come there's so much planned after his death. what is is expecting in the coming days. >> . >> the military possibles are not saying exactly which one. notified by now of a need to make their plans in order to get here, in time for the funeral. they will be lying in state, which at the moment is supposed to only be one day, and that will be before opportunities to see him, to pay their respects in person after which his body is supposed to be transferred to the union in victoria, where there will be a state funeral that will televised by the board pass tor, so that everyone can be involved and hear the words. not only family members but all of the dig nit tears would be here, after which his body would be transferred to his home village. which is in the eastern cape. quite a rural area, and it would be
, the crucible of the world's three great monotheistic religions become known not as the subject of constant struggle, but as the golden city of peace and unity embodied the aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. peace is possible because we have courageous leaders who have already taken significant political risks for peace. the time is approaching when they will have to take even more. they have shown real courage, both president abbas and prime minister netanyahu. president abbas has made tough choices. he has stayed the course, despite people in his team saying you ought to get out of here, look at those settlements, they are making a fool of you. believe me, that battle has been going on. i deal with it every week. at the same time, there has been israeli soldiers shot and killed in the west bank and other acts of incitement. prime minister netanyahu has made tough choices. just this week, he reaffirmed his commitment to a palestinian state. he said israel is ready for an historic peace. peace is possible today because the arab league has also made tough choices. for the first
. and so it's so important. i think of abraham, joshua, the great rabbi. he said you can sum up religion in one word, remember. and so we remember these stories. >> speaking of remembering, when is your christmas eve service. >> christmas eve of course at 7 o'clock. fairfield community united methodist church. you've been there quite a number of times. in fact you brought my mother on easter. i thought that was significant. >> seven o'clock on christmas eve. good time to be there. >> sunday mornings at 10:30. >> well, it's an easy drive up from the bay area. >> right. >> go there once -- one of the best preachers, one of the best preaches there is. thanks for having me on, ron. >> thank you. >> merry christmas to you. >> merry christmas to all of you. thank you for joining us. [son] all right,she has no idea. [man] no one told her,right? [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> and welcome to bay sunday, everybody. i'm your host. pardon the voice. we begin with our pitch. if you've got a show idea, we'd love to hear from you. go to our website, scroll down to bay sunday and hopefully we can all hook u
was running for commander in chief. his religion, his faith, has to be reflected in how he lives his life. that's a much more important approach for the folks in the political arena to take. >> kevin, a.b., van, thanks so much for being with us on this monday. really appreciate it. >>> coming up for us next on "the lead," we'll be right back. no, a rookie in the nba is making millions but thanks to his mother, he's not able to spend any of it. that's our sports lead. la's known definitely for its traffic, congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from th
. somebody a strong bailiff in their religion. i have a strong belief in my religion. it doesn't mean i'm going an extreme and do something violent that's what we have to deal with. we have to deal with the elements in whatever walk of life that will turn to violence and challenge not only societies that can't take care of themselves, but also us in our way of life. i think that's a difficult challenge that we're facing. i think as we look around the world and see societies and the underpinnings whey describe in some there's a sense of hopelessness. that's where we have to understand that. we have to decide whether we're going do anything about it or not. some cases question some case we can't. what we would like to do is help other nations and other regions of the world, certainly to be able to help themselves. that's what a global leader should do. i think that's what we try do all the time. as i see the military, with the military has been involved in over the years. that's with we try to do. it doesn't make any difference what their intkd. other questions? let me go income the back.
of marriage and all of that. i agree that you can't force a religion. you certainly cannot legislate a religion to accept it, but there is the reality, today is, that there's going to be probably 17 states by the end of this year who are waiting for the illinois law to get signed and new mexico, supreme court case to be decided, but there could be up to 17 states by the end of this year in the next several months that have gay marriage. that number is going to grow. it's not going to decrease. so this debate is on the brink of becoming moot. >> i mean, sure there are some social costs. we look at countries such as benevolence or sweden, the cohabitation rates have risen. less people getting the. more people are putting marriage off. >> is that because of gay marriage? >> harvey i think so spent it's because straight people don't want to get married. they just want to shack up spent i think we've made into a quaint social custom instead of, i think our policy would be better served strengthening marriage and making sure every child our gay speedy so how does gay marriage we can -- how
their religion is to destroy us. host: we will have you respond to that. negotiating in a religious way? guest: he is right to a great extent. we arenians have said the great evil and they're going to wipe israel off the face of the earth. in the middle eastern culture, it is looked upon with high regard to get the best deal possible no matter what it takes, that includes lying. that is one reason the gulf states like to work with the u.s., because we are honest and transparent. they like doing business with us as opposed to their partners or even the communist chinese. they like doing business with people that are honest and transparent. that is an underpinning to these negotiations. once again, if you are willing to blow yourself up and commit suicide in order to blow up other people, you are not a rational person. up other people, you are not a rational person. that is to you are dealing with when you are dealing with uranian's. host: -- iranians. host: you are saying that all middle eastern countries are this way? part of the middle eastern culture to get the best deal that you can, wheth
interpretation of religion. we are to the first world trade in the bombing in 93, remember. the people who are getting pummeled in bosnia were muslims. it was a source of concern to people across the world. i received calls from both the pope and the king of saudi arabia, asking me to intervene and bath and. and i wondered whether that was the first time they've ever been on the same side of an issue. to call broke said it was the problem from. and when we were once discussing how everything happens at once, the aftermath of somalia, haiti, bosnia, toilet cracked one of the stress lines the whole time he worked in the white house. he said you know, sometimes i really missed the cold war. bosnia in some ways became a memoir for the 21st century. it was the first conflict, which reminded us that the end of the cold war basically took the veil off this mh we were privileged to have come even when it didn't fully comport with reality that there was a bipolar world and is dangerous otherwise come with all these nuclear weapons hanging around, at least it was organized. even our spies helped eac
and safeguards the freedoms of speech, press, and religion. as the u.s. attempted to encourage ashe nations to develop a transparent society they need to look no further than their democratic neighbor. i want to pause right there and again yield to my friend as we continue this conversation and move forward on why this matters and bringing up these ideas of a relationship that's deeply rooted in history and of mutual sharing and not one going seemingly behind the back of the other. mr. schneider: you talk about the relationship. as you noted, harry s. trow truman was the first -- harry s. truman was the first to recognize the state of israel after the british left. immediately upon its declaration of independence, israel was attacked by five nations. throughout its history, israel has faced hostility from its neighbors throughout the region. since 1973 in the yom kippur war, as a 12-year-old boy, i remember vividly coming out of synagogue that day, sitting in the back seat of my parents' car, listening to the radio, not knowing if israel was going to survive. it was an intiss ten rble threa
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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